Quince duo – paste and jelly

I found this recipe for membrillo (quince paste) and used the strained liquid to make quince jelly by adding equal quantities of sugar and heating to setting point. I tested the jelly by putting a dollop in the freezer and when it wrinkled on the saucer it was ready to be bottled.

Six quinces went a very long way! The lemon zest in the membrillo gives a lovely tang.

  • 4 – 6 ripe quinces
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • White sugar (equal in volume to the cooked quince pulp – see ‘Method’)

Special Equipment

  • Sharp knife
  • Large saucepan with a lid
  • 20cm x 20cm cake tin
  • Muslin or a ‘jelly bag’

Method for Making Dulce de Membrillo (Quince Paste)

  1. Using a sharp knife, carefully peel and core the quinces, then chop into rough chunks.
  2. Place the fruit in a large saucepan and add the lemon zest and enough water to cover. Place a lid on the pan and bring to a simmer over low heat. Cook gently for about an hour until the fruit is very soft and a rosy pink colour.
  3. Once the fruit is cooked, drain into muslin or a jelly bag and strain for at least an hour or overnight to remove the excess liquid. Note: This strained liquid can be used to make a lovely quince jelly by boiling to setting point.
  4. Put the strained fruit is a food processor or push through a food mill. Measure the volume of the pulp in a large measuring jog or similar, and then return it to the large saucepan. Now measure out an equal volume of white sugar and add that to the pan as well.
  5. Place the pan of low to medium heat and stir to dissolve the sugar. Once dissolved, add the lemon juice and reduce the heat to low. Simmer gently for 1-2 hours, stirring occasionally, until the membrillo is thick and a deep pink.
  6. Preheat an oven to 50°C (120F) and line the cake tin with baking paper. Pour in the membrillo and bake for one hour so that it is dry, but not browned. Remove, and leave to cool in the tin.
  7. Wrap the cooled membrillo in foil or cling film and store in the refrigerator.

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